For Wireless Network Storage – Seagate Wireless Plus is Da Best

Casey Nolan

by - | 4 years ago
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26 Mar

Infinarium Rating

$196.00 to $197.94

Review Date : 07/15/13

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91Zi30lUHpL._SL1500_Codenamed STCK1000100, the Seagate Wireless Plus 1 TB hard drive drove me to expect a lot from the company. Frankly, I haven’t had a lot of luck with hard drives, especially Seagate. Summer season’s a real bitch to deal with where I live. Temperatures go high; egg fry high, and Seagate drives burn at the slightest hint of warm room temps.

Now you are wondering, okay this guy doesn’t know jack shit about hard drives because he doesn’t have a proper CPU cooling system installed. Well, as a matter of fact I do have a Cooler Master casing, nice CPU coolants and multiple LED cooling fans for my PC. I may not have the best liquid cooling system, but I know how to keep my gauges in check.

But when I talk about Seagate drives giving way in Summer season, I really mean that. Recently, I lost 1 TB of invaluable data to a Seagate drive because it started emitting a “Tik Tik Tik” sound; apparently it was my second Seagate drive that developed the same error. The data was lost to temperature spikes. So I switched to Western Digital drives. I was amazed because WD wireless or wired hard drives are like cockroaches; they are resilient to anything rough.

I promised myself not to go back to Seagate. Things,however, changed when I spotted the Seagate Wireless Plus 1 TB drive. In the heart of my hearts, I always had a thing for Seagate and this hard drive changed it. Not because it helps you get away with tons of wireless storage within seconds; not because this wireless hard drive has 1 TB storage space – it’s just that I wanted to give another shot to Seagate.  

Highlights – The Shorty Short Version of Seagate Wireless Hard Drive:

This is going to be a lengthy review. I am just stating the highlights here in case you are new to wireless hard drives.

Who is this Wireless Hard Drive for?

  • Hobbyists that like to try out new tech products for fun.
  • People who need portable memory round the clock for smartphone or wireless data streaming.
  • Gamers who never have enough of pristine quality high memory hard drives.
  • Network specialists who require cheap wireless network storage devices.

Seagate Wireless Plus 1 TB on the Right vs. Seagate GoFlex Drive on the Left – CNET Images

Seagate Wireless Plus 1 TB on the Right vs. Seagate GoFlex Drive on the Left - CNET Images

That being said, let’s do a quick walkthrough of this hard drive. The appended steps are for gamers and entertainment freaks who require Wi-Fi streaming at home. Make sure that all your files are supported by Seagate Media App; things will work like a charm this way. 

  • Seagate Wireless Plus 1 TB hard drive has a built in Wi-Fi connector/ detector.
  • You can charge this network storage drive through a wall USB wart, a Nikon USB charger, a PS3 or Xbox 360 USB Port, a PC USB input port – so on and so forth.
  • You cannot perform a USB hard drive connector and a Wireless connection at the same time.
  • You can upload your files directly to the Seagate wireless hard drive without connecting to the USB ports.
  • You will have to turn the drive ON and leave it be for a few seconds to help establish Seagate WiFi connection to your router.
  • If the Seagate Media App was not available for some reason, download it from the official Seagate website or through trusted 3rd party links.

Seagate Wireless Plus Drive connected to Samsung Smart TV - Credit CNET Images

Seagate Wireless Plus Drive connected to Samsung Smart TV – Credit CNET Images

Seagate Wireless Hard Drive Rocks because:

  • It has a simple plug and play set up. Right out of the box, you don’t have to go through hefty manuals or installation procedures to get things going. Plug and Play? Get it?
  • 1 TB storage space, and that too on a wireless hard drive is more than enough. Due to high RPM cycle speed, this Seagate hard drive is more than enough for “average” gamers.
  • In built Wi-Fi connector works seamlessly well with any kind of outside wireless connection. Turn the drive On and give at least 50 seconds to establish connection.
  • Once established, the connection helps you upload files with drag and drop ease.
  • Very attractive interface. In some way, the Seagate drive interface resembles Western Digital Passport USB drives. Looks damn good.
  • USB 3.0 supported, alongside a 1X USB 3.0 cable that comes in the box.
  • Long term warranty ensures immediate product replacement.
  • Seagate Media App to help you connect effortlessly with iPad, iPod, Smartphones, HTC devices, SmartTV technology and so much more.
  • Great battery life
  • Enhanced in built cooling technology.

For iPads Users – An Amazon Customer’s Advice

* Video: H.264 video, MPEG-4, Motion-JPEG
* Audio: AAC, MP3, M4a, Audible (formats 2, 3, 4), Apple Lossless, AIFF, WAV
* Documents: Microsoft® Office®, iWork®, Adobe® Acrobat® (PDF)
* Select files supported by third-party apps
For Laptops, Tablets, and Smartphones
* Any files supported by your device’s applications

I just noticed that I wrote down a shit load of bullet points. However, they were necessary to help us both understand what this hard drive is all about. It is offering something new and out of the way. Apparently, wireless technology is so “in” these days that it will completely replace wired hard drives soon enough.

And Now the Detailed Seagate Wireless Plus Review for You!

Right off the bat, this drive has proven its mettle. Earlier I lamented the poor temperature management performance and my dissatisfaction. To me, buying this hard drive was a big deal. I had my doubts but I went against them. Isn’t this something that impulsive buyers do?

Quick look at the Seagate Media App Interface brings something new to the eyes – CNET Images

Quick look at the Seagate Media App Interface brings something new to the eyes - CNET Images

I have to say that throughout the 2 week time period, this wireless storage drive has performed well against anything I had to throw at it. It works as advertised. Think of stutter free streaming directly to your notebook, or portable tablet device, you will get it all.

I streamed 1080p standard videos and that too with simultaneous users logged into this drive. The first time usage was a little ornery because once we turned it on, we didn’t know how to turn it off. Otherwise, on performance level, the drive works amazingly fast.

Now you are thinking about the unresponsive moments because that’s what you are supposed to look for before buying this hard drive. There are times when you will find the Seagate 1 TB plus wireless network storage hard drive’s buttons a little irritating. The company has not provided too many instructions on how to turn it off “properly”, without causing any data corruption or whatsoever.

Also, the drive says that it supports DLNA protection mode. I haven’t read a lot about it on the box cover or in the Seagate hard drive wireless manual. But from whatever I have learned so far, I will be sharing it later in this review. For now, let’s do a brick by brick analysis of this portable device.

Size and Logistics: The Seagate Wireless Plus 1 TB is the latest of its kind in the wireless network storage device market. The drive has a sleek look, with 5’’ X 3.5’’ X 3.4’’ dimensions. You can easily hold the drive in your hand. It gives a cool metallic high quality product feeling.

Remember the GoFlex series? Perhaps you don’t but I took the liberty of taking a look at the USB 3.0 circuitry. After all, the USB 3.0 is the latest ongoing high speed data transfer standard. I figured out I might as well take a look at the drive’s USB built. The 3.0 connection has a separate plugin bar – it is called the USM Adapter in technical lingo.

71nJYT1BAtL._SL1500_The adapter adds almost 3/8’’ length to the drive. If Seagate is considering an upgrade, it will probably go for Firewire, eSATA or Thunderbolt integration. These standards will have to be implemented while keeping the micro technology in mind. Otherwise, if the hard drive is too big or bulky, it kinda botches down the purpose of a powerful portable drive.

The USB 3.0 cable has an approx. 18’’ length. You can buy a new one if you have lost or accidentally damaged this one.

Power Consumption: Seagate wireless plus 1 TB drive has a very efficient power consumption mode. Quite frankly, it is not the consumption that piqued my attention; it was the overall charge store timing. Once charged, this hard drive lasts for a long time.

I did talk about a USB 3.0 cable that comes with this drive. Chances are that you are using a USB 2.0 port/ cable. Well, the good news is that this drive goes both ways. Bisexual? Perhaps, yes. But on topic, I’d like to say that there is a 5 Volts 2a USB charger block. It has foldable prongs and a think 40’’ USB 2.0 cable. This is what you are going to use for portable device or direct wall wart charging.

NEVER LOOSE SIGHT OF THIS CABLE. This is the only mean of charging the Seagate Wireless Plus portable hard drive. Perhaps there is a replacement available, but I am still looking for a spare cable, which means that this charging cable is very hard to find.

Seagate Warranty: Okay, imagine you have burned your hard drive or damaged it to an extent where you cant access the data. However, you know that your files are intact in there somewhere. Now given the current situation, you want to turn in your Seagate Wireless Plus 1 TB hard disk. What do do?

Personally, I am not a huge fan of Seagate warranty. They will offer you a replacement but they’ll do so on their own terms.

Here’s how the warranty breaks down:

  • Seagate Wireless and Wired Hard Drive Warranty must be within the validity time period.
  • The affected hard drive, if FIXED, does not guarantee any data protection. Once lost, all your files will be gone.
  • You will have to ship the hard drive by spending your own money on shipping cost. If this is expensive, you are better off with a new hard drive.
  • Seagate will offer a new wireless hard drive at the cost of your lost files!

Seagate Wireless WiFi Performance: Okay, it is about time we take a look at the wireless technology. After all, this WiFi thing is what this hard drive is all about. How does the Wi-Fi mode work on Seagate network storage drives, such as this one?

91GqH-TejIL._SL1500_The STCK1000100 wireless is turned On after you power on the drive. Push the button to do so. Wait for a minute or slightly less than a minute so that the glowing blue light turns steady blue. The Western Digital Passport drive also has a glowing blue light which turns steady after a while.

On your portable device, it will show that a Seagate Wireless connection has been established. This is it. You are ready to stream your media, or download/ upload your files to other devices in the house. The wireless network does not have a security password protection by default. In the Seagate Wireless network settings, you can:

  • Create a Seagate Wireless Protection password.
  • Change the default name of the Wireless Plus 1 TB hard drive to your liking.

iOS and Android App GUI/  Interface: For Android and iOS users, the Seagate Wireless hard drive has a separate interface. This interface is technically a web page, where you are taken whenever your connection is established via an iPhone, iPod, iPad or an Android device.

The icon placement gives a shelf like look. These icons have a little screen orientation problem on multiple devices, but at least they do not overlap each other. This would have made icon handling a pain in the ass. I have accessed my Seagate Wireless hard drive via HTC One X, KindleFire and iPad 2, all the icons in the WebApp look okay.

PassThru/ Multiple Device Connections: What good is a wireless network storage drive that doesn’t allow multiple user access? Seagate wireless 1 TB drive supports simultaneous user connections. My brother’s smartphone is set up in the other room, while the Wi-Fi router and landline routers are set up in my room.

Either way, whenever we have the hard drive lying around anywhere, we access it through the Seagate PassThru internet access feature. To connect with this hard drive, you have to “Scan” for new devices. The router will give this hard drive an IP address. You can manually browse the files by typing down the Seagate Wireless IP address in this format : (###.###.#.###).

File Transfer/ Uploads: My brother assigned the 172.25.0.1 IP to the Seagate Wireless Plus 1 TB hard drive. We used Internet Explorer 9 browser when accessing the hard drive wirelessly through a PC wireless dongle or a laptop.

The experience did not go well. IE 9 does not have a progress indicator. It took forever to see any successful uploads. Maybe we got carried away with multiple file uploads and decided to transfer large files all at once. Whatever the reason was, it took forever!

With the Windows Explorer – 172.25.0.1Public-01Videos directory access, I got the file transfer bar. At 2 Mbps speed, despite of the fact that my data transfer speed goes up to 8Mbps, the Seagate hard drive did well on wireless mode. You can also browse the internet without any performance hitches.

Seagate Push Down External Hard drive Wallpaper - Google Images

For ultra fast wireless file transfers, you will have to spend decent bucks on heavy duty routers. The Medialink Wireless Router is not a bad option for people looking to spend at least $50.

Multiple Device Support: As mentioned a couple of times before, the Seagate Wireless HD works flawlessly with multiple and simultaneous device access. I had no trouble connecting both my Android and iOS devices to the hard drive.

Renindexing of Data: In case your data clusters get damaged, the Seagate App will try to reindex your files. My indexing got trashed when I received this message: Data Loading Failed. I panicked and contacted the Seagate officials through Seagate Chat. They did not help much but told me to call their Advanced Networking noobs at 800 – 732 – 4283.

They told me to leave the drive on after deleting hidden system folders in it. I don’t remember the exact folder names but they were two folders in the Seagate Wireless Plus 1 TB network storage drive. I restarted the drive and let it reindex all my data for more an hour. It all went well by the end of the day.

All in all, this hard drive is a great companion to those who are looking for a futuristic appeal to data transfers. The wireless technology is not new, but the way Seagate incorporated it into its wireless hard drives, I think they have a shot at selling their products in this market.

Word from Seagate (On Seagate Wireless Plus 1 TB Network Storage Drive):

With Seagate Wireless Plus, you can enjoy your media and access your files without wires or the Internet. This mobile storage device broadcasts its own Wi-Fi network, so you can wirelessly stream your media and files to your tablet or smartphone on-the-go and off-the-grid. The free Seagate Media app for iOS and Android makes it easy to navigate and enjoy content wherever you go.

Forget about having to choose which files to load onto your tablet or smartphone before a trip. Bring it all with you! Wireless Plus has 1TB of built-in storage, which means you can load up to 500 movies or thousands of songs, photos and documents1. Simply drag-and-drop to load files wirelessly from your PC or Mac computer or use the USB 3.0 adapter to load files up to 10× faster than Wi-Fi N. Wireless Plus allows up to eight tablets and smartphones to access and store content at the same time. Leave it in your bag, set it on the table, place it anywhere in the car with a range of up to 150ft you’ll never feel tethered to your storage. Best of all, by creating its own Wi-Fi network, there is no need for an Internet connection and you don’t have to use your data plan. System Requirements: Wi-Fi enabled devices with a Web browser, iOS 4.3 or higher, Android 2.3 or higher, or Kindle Fire Computer: Windows 8, Windows 7, Windows Vista , Windows XP, Mac OS X 10.6 or higher.

This entry was posted on Tuesday, March 26th, 2013 at 12:25 PM and is filed under Accessories, Home Slider, Reviews. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.

Casey Nolan

About Casey Nolan

Hello everyone, I am Bilal Malik AKA 'Casey Nolan'; Head Editor and owner of 'Infinarium.Com'. For product reviews, article requests, recommendations, or if you just want to get something off your chest, send me an email at techguy@infinarium.com.

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